Tropical Cyclone Naming (2022)

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Tropical Cyclone Naming (1)

Tropical Cyclone Naming

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Natural hazards

WMO maintains rotating lists of names which are appropriate for each Tropical Cyclone basin. If a cyclone is particularly deadly or costly, then its name is retired and replaced by another one.

Tropical cyclones can last for a week or more; therefore there can be more than one cyclone at a time. Weather forecasters give each tropical cyclone a name to avoid confusion. In general, tropical cyclones are named according to the rules atregional level. In the Atlantic and in the Southern hemisphere (Indian ocean and South Pacific), tropical cyclones receive names in alphabetical order, and women and men's names are alternated. Nations inthe Northern Indian ocean began using a new system for naming tropical cyclones in 2000; the names are listed alphabetically country wise, and are neutral gender wise.
The common rule is that the name list is proposed by the National Meteorological and Hydrological Services (NMHSs) of WMO Members of a specific region, and approved by the respective tropical cyclone regional bodies at their annual/biennual sessions.

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Historical Background

The practice of naming storms (tropical cyclones) began years ago in order to help in the quick identification of storms in warning messages because names are presumed to be far easier to remember than numbers and technical terms. Many agree that appending names to storms makes it easier for the media to report on tropical cyclones, heightens interest in warnings and increases community preparedness.

Experience shows that the use of short, distinctive given names in written as well as spoken communications is quicker and less subject to error than the older more cumbersome latitude-longitude identification methods. These advantages are especially important in exchanging detailed storm information between hundreds of widely scattered stations, coastal bases, and ships at sea.

In the beginning, storms were named arbitrarily. An Atlantic storm that ripped off the mast of a boat named Antje became known as Antje's hurricane. Then the mid-1900's saw the start of the practice of using feminine names for storms.

In the pursuit of a more organized and efficient naming system, meteorologists later decided to identify storms using names from a list arranged alphabetically. Thus, a storm with a name which begins with A, like Anne, would be the first storm to occur in the year. Before the end of the 1900's, forecasters started using male names for those forming in the Southern Hemisphere.

Since 1953, Atlantic tropical storms have been named from lists originated by the National Hurricane Center. They are now maintained and updated by an international committee of theWorld Meteorological Organization. The original name lists featured only women's names. In 1979, men's names were introduced and they alternate with the women's names. Six lists are used in rotation. Thus, the 2019list will be used again in 2025.

The only time that there is a change in the list is if a storm is so deadly or costly that the future use of its name on a different storm would be inappropriate for reasons of sensitivity. If that occurs, then at an annual meeting by the WMO Tropical Cyclone Committees (called primarily to discuss many other issues) the offending name is stricken from the list and another name is selected to replace it. Infamous storm names such as Mangkhut (Philippines, 2018), Irma and Maria (Caribbean, 2017), Haiyan (Philippines, 2013),Sandy (USA, 2012),Katrina (USA, 2005), Mitch (Honduras, 1998) and Tracy (Darwin, 1974) are examples for this.

Procedure of Naming Tropical Cyclones

There is a strict procedure to determine a list of tropical cyclone names in an ocean basinby the Tropical Cyclone Regional Body responsible for that basinat its annual/biennial meeting. There are five tropical cyclone regional bodies, i.e. ESCAP/WMO Typhoon Committee, WMO/ESCAP Panel on Tropical Cyclones, RA I Tropical Cyclone Committee, RA IV Hurricane Committee, and RA V Tropical Cyclone Committee. For instance, Hurricane Committee determines a pre-designated list of hurricane names for six years separately at its annual session. The pre-designated list of hurricane names are proposed by its Members that include National Meteorological and Hydrological Services in the North/Central America and the Caribbean. Naming procedures in other regions are almost the same as in the Caribbean. In some of the regions, the lists are established by alphabetical order of the names. Inother regions, the lists are established following the alphabetical order of the country names - please see "Tropical Cyclone Names Worldwide" below for more details. In general, tropical cyclones are named according to the rules at a regional level.

It is important to note that tropical cyclones/hurricanes/typhoons are not named after any particular person. The names selected are those that are familiar to the people in each region. Stormsare named for people to easily understand and remember the tropical cyclone/hurricane/typhoon intheir region, thusfacilitating disaster risk awareness, preparedness, management and reduction.

Tropical Cyclone Names Worldwide

Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and the North Atlantic Names

The six lists are used in rotation and the 2022 list will be used again in 2028.

The list of hurricane names covers only 21 letters of the alphabet as it is difficult to find six suitable names (one for each of the 6 rotating lists) starting with Q, U, X, Y and Z. In the interests of safety, the name must be instantly recognizable. In addition, English, French and Spanish names are used in balance on the list in order to reflect the geographical coverage of Atlantic and Caribbean storms. The list is also gender balanced andrespectful of societal sensitivities.

Until 2020, when a very active hurricane season occurredand the list was exhausted, the Greek alphabet wasused (Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, Epsilon, Zeta, Eta, Theta, etc). This has occurred twice. The first time was in 2005 - a record-breaking year with several devastating hurricanes including Katrina, Rita and Wilma,whose names were all retired - when six names from the Greek alphabet were used. The second wasin 2020 - a new-record breaking yearwith 30 named tropical storms of whichnine names from the Greek alphabet, including the devastating hurricanes Eta and Iota.

Starting 2021, in lieu of the Greek alphabet, the lists ofsupplemental tropical cyclones nameswill be used.

A name can be retired or withdrawn from the active list at the request of any Member State if a tropical cyclone by that name acquires special notoriety because of the human casualties and damage incurred. The decision to withdraw or retire a name is reached by consensus (or majority vote) during the WMO Regional Association IV Hurricane Committee session that immediately follows the season in question.

Background information regarding the use of the Greek alphabet

TheWMO Regional Association IVHurricane Committee annual session in 2006discussed the use of the Greek alphabet for hurricane naming, and whether a Greek alphabet name should be retired as done for a regular name when it meets the criteria for retirement. The Committee felt that the use of the Greek alphabet was not expected to be frequent enough to warrant any change in the existing naming procedure for the foreseeable future and therefore decided that the naming system would remain unchanged and that the Greek alphabet would continue to be used.

In this connection, the Committee also agreed that it was not practical to “retire into hurricane history” a letter in the Greek alphabet. Therefore, if a significant storm designated by a letter of the Greek alphabet, in either the Atlantic or eastern North Pacific Basin, is “retired”, the year of occurrence and other details would be included.

However, after the record-breaking 2020 season, the WMO Regional Association IVHurricane Committee annual session in 2021, decided to end the useof the Greek alphabetand instead, established two lists of supplemental tropical cyclone names, one of the Atlantic, one for the Pacific.

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

Supplemental List

Alex

Arlene

Alberto

Andrea

Arthur

Ana

Adria

Bonnie

Bret

Beryl

Barry

Bertha

Bill

Braylen

Colin

Cindy

Chris

Chantal

Cristobal

Claudette

Caridad

Danielle

Don

Debby

Dexter

Dolly

Danny

Deshawn

Earl

Emily

Ernesto

Erin

Edouard

Elsa

Emery

Fiona

Franklin

Francine

Fernand

Fay

Fred

Foster

Gaston

Gert

Gordon

Gabrielle

Gonzalo

Grace

Gemma

Hermine

Harold

Helene

Humberto

Hanna

Henri

Heath

Ian

Idalia

Isaac

Imelda

Isaias

Imani

Isla

Julia

Jose

Joyce

Jerry

Josephine

Julian

Jacobus

Karl

Katia

Kirk

Karen

Kyle

Kate

Kenzie

Lisa

Lee

Leslie

Lorenzo

Leah

Larry

Lucio

Martin

Margot

Milton

Melissa

Marco

Mindy

Makayla

Nicole

Nigel

Nadine

Nestor

Nana

Nicholas

Nolan

Owen

Ophelia

Oscar

Olga

Omar

Odette

Orlanda

Paula

Philippe

Patty

Pablo

Paulette

Peter

Pax

Richard

Rina

Rafael

Rebekah

Rene

Rose

Ronin

Shary

Sean

Sara

Sebastien

Sally

Sam

Sophie

Tobias

Tammy

Tony

Tanya

Teddy

Teresa

Tayshaun

Virginie

Vince

Valerie

Van

Vicky

Victor

Viviana

Walter

Whitney

William

Wendy

Wilfred

Wanda

Will

Eastern North Pacific Names

The six lists are used in rotation and the 2022 list will be used again in 2028.

NB: Starting 2021, in lieu of the Greek alphabet, the lists ofsupplemental tropical cyclones nameswill be used. See the paragraph above "Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and the North Atlantic Names."

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

Supplemental List

Agatha

Adrian

Aletta

Alvin

Amanda

Andres

Aidan

Blas

Beatriz

Bud

Barbara

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Boris

Blanca

Bruna

Celia

Calvin

Carlotta

Cosme

Cristina

Carlos

Carmelo

Darby

Dora

Daniel

Dalila

Douglas

Dolores

Daniella

Estelle

Eugene

Emilia

Erick

Elida

Enrique

Esteban

Frank

Fernanda

Fabio

Flossie

Fausto

Felicia

Flor

Georgette

Greg

Gilma

Gil

Genevieve

Guillermo

Gerardo

Howard

Hilary

Hector

Henriette

Hernan

Hilda

Hedda

Ivette

Irwin

Ileana

Ivo

Iselle

Ignacio

Izzy

Javier

Jova

John

Juliette

Julio

Jimena

Jacinta

Kay

Kenneth

Kristy

Kiko

Karina

Kevin

Kenito

Lester

Lidia

Lane

Lorena

Lowell

Linda

Luna

Madeline

Max

Miriam

Mario

Marie

Marty

Marina

Newton

Norma

Norman

Narda

Norbert

Nora

Nancy

Orlene

Otis

Olivia

Octave

Odalys

Olaf

Ovidio

Paine

Pilar

Paul

Priscilla

Polo

Pamela

Pia

Roslyn

Ramon

Rosa

Raymond

Rachel

Rick

Rey

Seymour

Selma

Sergio

Sonia

Simon

Sandra

Skylar

Tina

Todd

Tara

Tico

Trudy

Terry

Teo

Virgil

Veronica

Vicente

Velma

Vance

Vivian

Violeta

Winifred

Wiley

Willa

Wallis

Winnie

Waldo

Wilfredo

Xavier

Xina

Xavier

Xina

Xavier

Xina

Xinia

Yolanda

York

Yolanda

York

Yolanda

York

Yariel

Zeke

Zelda

Zeke

Zelda

Zeke

Zelda

Zoe

Central North Pacific Names

The names are used one after the other. When the bottom of one list is reached, the next name is the top of the next list.

Central North Pacific Names

List 1

List 2

List 3

List 4

Akoni
Ema
Hone
Iona
Keli
Lala
Moke
Nolo
Olana
Pena
Ulana
Wale

Aka
Ekeka
Hene
Iolana
Keoni
Lino
Mele
Nona
Oliwa
Pama
Upana
Wene

Alika
Ele
Huko
Iopa
Kika
Lana
Maka
Neki
Omeka
Pewa
Unala
Wali

Ana
Ela
Halola
Iune
Kilo
Loke
Malia
Niala
Oho
Pali
Ulika
Walaka

Western North Pacific and the South China Sea Names

The Regional Specialized Meteorological Centre (RSMC)Tokyo- Typhoon Centre will assign a tropical cyclone a name from the list followed by a 4-digit identification number (in brackets). Names on the list will only be given to tropical cyclones of tropical storm strength or above. The names are adopted by ESCAP/WMO Typhoon Commitee and are used sequentially. That is, if the last storm of the year is Cimaron, the first storm of the next year is Jebi.
The names and their pronunciation are also available on the ESCAP/WMO Typhoon Committee website:http://www.typhooncommittee.org/list-of-names-for-tropical-cyclones/

Contributed by

I

II

III

IV

V

Name

Name

Name

Name

Name

Cambodia

Damrey

Kong-rey

Nakri

Krovanh

Trases

China

Haikui

Yinxing

Fengshen

Dujuan

Mulan

DPR Korea

Kirogi

Toraji

Kalmaegi

Surigae

Meari

Hong Kong, China

Yun-yeung

Man-yi

Fung-wong

Choi-wan

Ma-on

Japan

Koinu

Usagi

Koto

Koguma

Tokage

Lao PDR

Bolaven

Pabuk

Nokaen

Champi

Hinnamnor

Macao, China

Sanba

Wutip

Penha

In-fa

Muifa

Malaysia

Jelawat

Sepat

Nuri

Cempaka

Merbok

Micronesia

Ewiniar

Mun

Sinlaku

Nepartak

Nanmadol

Philippines

Maliksi

Danas

Hagupit

Lupit

Talas

RO Korea

Gaemi

Nari

Jangmi

Mirinae

Noru

Thailand

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Prapiroon

Wipha

Mekkhala

Nida

Kulap

U.S.A.

Maria

Francisco

Higos

Omais

Roke

Viet Nam

Son-Tinh

Co-May

Bavi

Conson

Sonca

Cambodia

Ampil

Krosa

Maysak

Chanthu

Nesat

China

Wukong

Bailu

Haishen

Dianmu

Haitang

DPR Korea

Jongdari

Podul

Noul

Mindulle

Nalgae

Hong Kong, China

Shanshan

Lingling

Dolphin

Lionrock

Banyan

Japan

Yagi

Kajiki

Kujira

Kompasu

Yamaneko

Lao PDR

Leepi

Nongfa

Chan-hom

Namtheun

Pakhar

Macao, China

Bebinca

Peipah

Peilou

Malou

Sanvu

Malaysia

Rumbia

Tapah

Nangka

Nyatoh

Mawar

Micronesia

Soulik

Mitag

Saudel

Rai

Guchol

Philippines

Cimaron

Ragasa

Narra

Malakas

Talim

RO Korea

Jebi

Neoguri

Gaenari

Megi

Doksuri

Thailand

Mangkhut

Bualoi

Atsani

Chaba

Khanun

U.S.A.

Barijat

Matmo

Etau

Aere

Lan

Viet Nam

Trami

Halong

Bang-Lang

Songda

Saola

Australian Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre's (TCWC) Area of Responsibility

The single list of names that are used by all of the Bureau of Meteorology Tropical Cyclone Warning Centres (TCWC) was introduced for the start of the 2008/09 season, replacing the three lists that existed previously. First name used for the 2008/2009 season is Anika, then Billy, etc.

The name of a new tropical cyclone is usually selected from this list of names. If a named cyclone moves into the Australian region from another country's zone of responsibility, the name assigned by that other country will be retained. The names are normally chosen in sequence, when the list is exhausted, we return to the start of the list.

Australia TCWC's Area of Responsibility

A
B
C

D
E
F
G

H
I

J
K
L

M
N
O
PQ
R
S

T
UV

WXYZ

Anika
Billy
Charlotte
Dominic
Ellie
Freddy
Gabrielle
Herman
Ilsa
Jasper
Kirrily
Lincoln
Megan
Neville
Olga
Paul
Robyn
Sean
Tasha
Vince
Zelia

Anthony
Bianca
Courtney
Dianne
Errol
Fina
Grant
Hayley
Iggy
Jenna
Koji
Luana
Mitchell
Narelle
Oran
Peta
Riordan
Sandra
Tim
Victoria
Zane

Alessia
Bruce
Catherine
Dylan
Edna
Fletcher
Gillian
Hadi
Ivana
Jack
Kate
Laszlo
Mingzhu
Nathan
Olwyn
Quincey
Raquel
Stan
Tatjana
Uriah
Yvette

Alfred
Blanche
Caleb
Dara
Ernie
Frances
Greg
Hilda
Irving
Joyce
Kelvin
Linda
Marco
Nora
Owen
Penny
Riley
Savannah
Trevor
Veronica
Wallace

Ann
Blake
Claudia
Damien
Esther
Ferdinand
Gretel
Harold
Imogen
Joshua
Kimi
Lucas
Marian
Niran
Odette
Paddy
Ruby
Seth
Tiffany
Vernon

Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre Nadi's Area of Responsibility

Lists A, B, C, and D are used sequentially one after the other. The first name in any given year is the one immediately following the last name from the previous year. List E is a list of replacement names if they become necessary. Wellington TCWC will name the cyclone, in consultation with RSMC Nadi, by using the next name from RSMC Nadi's list, if a tropical cyclone in the Wellington TCWC's area of responsibility, Wellington.

RSMC Nadi's Area of Responsibility

List A

List B

List C

List D

List E (standby)

Ana
Bina
Cody
Dovi
Eva
Fili
Gina
Hale
Irene
Judy
Kevin
Lola
Mal
Nat
Osai
Pita
Rae
Seru
Tam
Urmil
Vaianu
Wati
Xavier
Yani
Zita

Arthur
Becky
Chip
Denia
Elisa
Fotu
Glen
Hettie
Innis
Julie
Ken
Lin
Maciu
Nisha
Orea
Pearl
Rene
Sarah
Troy
Uinita
Vanessa
Wano

Yvonne
Zaka

Alvin
Bune
Cyril
Daphne
Eden
Florin
Garry
Haley
Isa
June
Kofi
Louise
Mike
Niko
Opeti
Perry
Reuben
Solo
Tuni
Ulu
Victor
Wanita

Yates
Zidane

Amos
Bart
Crystal
Donna
Ella
Fehi
Garth
Hola
Iris
Jo
Kala
Liua
Mona
Neil
Oma
Pola
Rita
Sarai
Tino
Uesi
Vicky
Wasi

Yolanda
Zazu

Aru
Ben
Chris
Danial
Emosi
Feki
Germaine
Hart
Ili
Josese
Kirio
Lute
Mata
Neta
Olivia
Pana
Rex
Samadiyo
Tasi
Uila
Velma
Wane

Yasa
Zanna

Port Moresby Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre's Area of Responsibility

The name of a new tropical cyclone is determined by sequential cycling through List A. Standby List B is used to replace retired names in List A and any replacement will be added to the bottom of List A to maintain the alphabetical order.

Port Moresby TCWC's Area of Responsibility

List A

List B (standby)

Alu
Buri
Dodo
Emau
Fere
Hibu
Ila
Kama
Lobu
Maila

Nou
Obaha
Paia
Ranu
Sabi
Tau
Ume
Vali
Wau
Auram

Jakarta Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre's Area of Responsibility

​The name of a new tropical cyclone is determined by sequential cycling through List A. Standby List B is used to replace retired names in List A and any replacement will be added to the bottom of List A to maintain the alphabetical order.

Jakarta TCWc's Area of Responsibility

List A

List B (standby)

Anggrek
Bakung
Cempaka
Dahlia
Flamboyan
Kenanga
Lili
Mangga
Seroja
Teratai

Anggur
Belimbing
Duku
Jambu
Lengkeng
Melati
Nangka
Pisang
Rambuta
Sawo

Northern Indian Ocean Names - Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal

The WMO/ESCAP Panel on Tropical Cyclones (hereafter the Panel)at its twenty-seventh Session held in 2000 in Muscat, Sultanate of Oman, agreed in principal to assign names to the tropical cyclones in the Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea. The naming of the tropical cyclones over north Indian Ocean commenced from September 2004, with names provided by eight Members. Since then, five countries have joined the Panel.

  • The Panel Member’s names are listed alphabetically country wise.
  • The names will be used sequentially column wise.
  • The first name will start from the first row of column one and continue sequentially to the last row in the column thirteen.
  • The names of tropical cyclones over the north Indian Ocean will not be repeated, once used it will cease to be used again. The name should be new. It should not be there in the already existing list of any of the RSMCs worldwide including RSMC New Delhi.
  • The name of a tropical cyclone from south China Sea which crosses Thailand and emerge into the Bay of Bengal as a Tropical cyclone will not be changed.

The RSMC New Delhi Tropical Cyclone Center is responsible to name the tropical cyclones that have formed over the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian Sea when they have reached the relevant intensity.

The names to be used will be taken from the list below, starting with Nisarga, then Gati, Nivar, etc.

WMO/ESCAP Panel

Member countries

Column 1

Column 2

Column 3

Column 4

Name

Pron’

Name

Pron’

Name

Pron’

Name

Pron’

Bangladesh

Nisarga

Nisarga

Biparjoy

Biporjoy

Arnab

Ornab

Upakul

Upokul

India

Gati

Gati

Tej

Tej

Murasu

Murasu

Aag

Aag

Iran

Nivar

Nivar

Hamoon

Hamoon

Akvan

Akvan

Sepand

Sepand

Maldives

Burevi

Burevi

Midhili

Midhili

Kaani

Kaani

Odi

Odi

Myanmar

Tauktae

Tau’Te

Michaung

Migjaum

Ngamann

Ngaman

Kyarthit

Kjathi

Oman

Yaas

Yass

Remal

Re-Mal

Sail

Sail

Naseem

Naseem

Pakistan

Gulab

Gul-Aab

Asna

As-Na

Sahab

Sa-Hab

Afshan

Af-Shan

Qatar

Shaheen

Shaheen

Dana

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Dana

Lulu

Lulu

Mouj

Mouj

Saudi Arabia

Jawad

Jowad

Fengal

Feinjal

Ghazeer

Razeer

Asif

Aasif

Sri Lanka

Asani

Asani

Shakhti

Shakhti

Gigum

Gigum

Gagana

Gagana

Thailand

Sitrang

Si-Trang

Montha

Mon-Tha

Thianyot

Thian-Yot

Bulan

Bu-Lan

United Arab Emirates

Mandous

Man-Dous

Senyar

Sen-Yaar

Afoor

Aa-Foor

Nahhaam

Nah-Haam

Yemen

Mocha

Mokha

Ditwah

Ditwah

Diksam

Diksam

Sira

Sira

WMO/ESCAP Panel Member countries

Column 5

Column 6

Column 7

Column 8

Name

Pron’

Name

Pron’

Name

Pron’

Name

Pron’

Bangladesh

Barshon

Borshon

Rajani

Rojoni

Nishith

Nishith

Urmi

Urmi

India

Vyom

Vyom

Jhar

Jhaar

Probaho

Probaho

Neer

Neer

Iran

Booran

Booran

Anahita

Anahita

Azar

Azar

Pooyan

Pooyan

Maldives

Kenau

Kenau

Endheri

Endheri

Riyau

Riyau

Guruva

Guruva

Myanmar

Sapakyee

Zabagji

Wetwun

We’wum

Mwaihout

Mwei’hau

Kywe

Kjwe

Oman

Muzn

Muzn

Sadeem

Sadeem

Dima

Dima

Manjour

Manjour

Pakistan

Manahil

Ma-Na-Hil

Shujana

Shu-Ja-Na

Parwaz

Par-Waaz

Zannata

Zan Naa Ta

Qatar

Suhail

Es’hail

Sadaf

Sadaf

Reem

Reem

Rayhan

Rayhan

Saudi Arabia

Sidrah

Sadrah

Hareed

Haareed

Faid

Faid

Kaseer

Kusaer

Sri Lanka

Verambha

Ve-Ram-Bha

Garjana

Garjana

Neeba

Neeba

Ninnada

Nin-Na-Da

Thailand

Phutala

Phu-Ta-La

Aiyara

Ai-Ya-Ra

Saming

Sa-Ming

Kraison

Krai-Son

United Arab Emirates

Quffal

Quf-Faal

Daaman

Daa-Man

Deem

Deem

Gargoor

Gar-Goor

Yemen

Bakhur

Bakhoor

Ghwyzi

Ghwayzi

Hawf

Hawf

Balhaf

Balhaf

WMO/ESCAP Panel Member countries

Column 9

Column 10

Column 11

Column 12

Column 13

Name

Pron’

Name

Pron’

Name

Pron’

Name

Pron’

Name

Pron’

Bangladesh

Meghala

Meghla

Samiron

Somiron

Pratikul

Protikul

Sarobor

Sorobor

Mahanisha

Mohanisha

India

Prabhanjan

Prabhanjan

Ghurni

Ghurni

Ambud

Ambud

Jaladhi

Jaladhi

Vega

Vega

Iran

Arsham

Arsham

Hengame

Hengame

Savas

Savas

Tahamtan

Tahamtan

Toofan

Toofan

Maldives

Kurangi

Kurangi

Kuredhi

Kuredhi

Horangu

Horangu

Thundi

Thundi

Faana

Faana

Myanmar

Pinku

Pinnku

Yinkaung

Jin Gaun

Linyone

Lin Joun

Kyeekan

Kji Gan

Bautphat

Bau’hpa

Oman

Rukam

Roukaam

Watad

Wa Tad

Al-jarz

Al-Jarouz

Rabab

Ra Bab

Raad

(Video) Cyclone Name list 2020 upcoming 25 Tropical names, country|Next Cyclone Name

Raad

Pakistan

Sarsar

Sar-Sar

Badban

Baad-Baan

Sarrab

Sarrab

Gulnar

Gul-Nar

Waseq

Waa-Seq

Qatar

Anbar

Anbar

Oud

Oud

Bahar

Bahar

Seef

Seef

Fanar

Fanaar

Saudi Arabia

Nakheel

Nakheel

Haboob

Haboob

Bareq

Bariq

Alreem

Areem

Wabil

Wobil

Sri Lanka

Viduli

Viduli

Ogha

Ogha

Salitha

Salitha

Rivi

Rivi

Rudu

Rudu

Thailand

Matcha

Mat-Cha

Mahingsa

Ma-Hing-Sa

Phraewa

Phrae-Wa

Asuri

A-Su-Ri

Thara

Tha-Ra

United Arab Emirates

Khubb

Khubb

Degl

Degl

Athmad

Ath-Md

Boom

Boom

Saffar

Saf-Faar

Yemen

Brom

Brom

Shuqra

Shuqrah

Fartak

Fartak

Darsah

Darsah

Samhah

Samhah

Southwest Indian Ocean Names

The list of names to be used in the South‑West Indian Ocean area for identifying tropical (or subtropical) storms that will develop during the next seasons within the area bounded by Equator to 40°S west of 90°E to the east coast of Africa, has been validated by the Tropical Cyclone Committee (TCC) at its last session. The three lists of names shown hereafter will serve as the reference and basis to establish the future lists, just rotating them forward and changing the names having been used operationally during the corresponding ended cyclone seasons, replacing them by new names provided by the Members (and never used before) at the next TCC session.

The name is chosen, following alphabetical order, from a predefined list of names validated for the basin and for the cyclone season of reference (starting each season with the name with the initial letter “A”), except when a tropical system already named in the South-East Indian Ocean (east of 90° E) shifts to the South-West Indian Ocean. In this case the original name is kept unchanged.

Cyclone season

2021/2022

2022/2023

2023/2024

Names

Provided by*

Names

Provided by

Names

Provided by

ANA

Mozambique (F)

ASHLEY

Seychelles (F)

ALVARO

Mozambique (M)

BATSIRAI

Zimbabawe (N)

BALITA

Madagascar (M)

BELAL

Mauritius (M)

CLIFF

Madagascar (M)

CHENESO

Botswana (F)

CANDICE

France (F)

DUMAKO

Eswatini (N)

DINGANI

Lesotho (M)

DJOUNGOU

Comoros (N)

EMNATI

Comoros (M)

ENALA

Malawi (F)

ELEANOR

Zimbabwe (F)

FEZILE

South Africa (M)

FABIEN

Mauritius (M)

FILIPO

Botswana (M)

GOMBE

Tanzania (N)

GEZANI

South Africa (M)

GAMANE

Eswatini (F)

HALIMA

Malawi (F)

HORACIO

Mozambique (M)

HIDAYA

Tanzania (F)

ISSA

Kenya (M)

INDUSA

Kenya (F)

IALY

Madagascar (F)

JASMINE

Mauritius (F)

JULUKA

Eswatini (M)

JEREMY

Seychelles (M)

KARIM

Seychelles (M)

KUNDAI

Zimbabwe (M)

KANGA

South Africa (N)

LETLAMA

Lesotho (M)

LISEBO

Lesotho (F)

LUDZI

Malawi (N)

MAIPELO

Botswana (N)

MICHEL

France (M)

MELINA

Tanzania (F)

NJAZI

Malawi (F)

NOUSRA

Comoros (F)

NOAH

France (M)

OSCAR

France (M)

OLIVIER

Mauritius (M)

ONIAS

Zimbabwe (M)

PAMELA

Tanzania (F)

POKERA

Malawi (F)

PELAGIE

Madagascar (F)

QUENTIN

Kenya (M)

QUINCY

Seychelles (F)

QUAMAR

Comoros (M)

RAJAB

Comoros (M)

REBAONE

Botswana (N)

RITA

Seychelles (F)

SAVANA

Mozambique (F)

SALAMA

Comoros (F)

SOLANI

Eswatini (M)

THEMBA

Eswatini (M)

TRISTAN

France (M)

TARIK

Mauritius (M)

UYAPO

Botswana (N)

URSULA

Kenya (F)

URILIA

South Africa (N)

VIVIANE

Mauritius (F)

VIOLET

South Africa (F)

VUYANE

Lesotho (M)

WALTER

South Africa (M)

WILSON

Mozambique (M)

WAGNER

Kenya (M)

XANGY

Madagascar (M)

XILA

Madagascar (M)

XUSA

Malawi (N)

YEMURAI

Zimbabwe (F)

YEKELA

Eswatini (M)

YARONA

Botswana (N)

ZANELE

Lesotho (F)

ZAINA

Tanzania (F)

ZACARIAS

Mozambique (M)

* in brackets is indicated the gender of the name

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FAQs

How are tropical cyclones named? ›

In general, tropical cyclones are named according to the rules at regional level. In the Atlantic and in the Southern hemisphere (Indian ocean and South Pacific), tropical cyclones receive names in alphabetical order, and women and men's names are alternated.

What are the 3 names used for tropical cyclones? ›

Depending on its location and strength, a tropical cyclone is referred to by different names, including hurricane (/ˈhʌrɪkən, -keɪn/), typhoon (/taɪˈfuːn/), tropical storm, cyclonic storm, tropical depression, or simply cyclone: A hurricane is a strong tropical cyclone that occurs in the Atlantic Ocean or northeastern ...

What are the four different names for tropical cyclone? ›

In the North Atlantic Ocean and the eastern North Pacific, they are called hurricanes. In the western North Pacific, the storms are referred to as typhoons. In the western South Pacific and the Indian Ocean, they are variously referred to as severe tropical cyclones, tropical cyclones, or simply cyclones.

Why are tropical cyclones named after females? ›

US meteorologists gave tropical storms women's names. Satellites were first used by the military and it is said that Air Force and Navy meteorologists, who plotted the movements of storms, named these storms after their wives and girlfriends.

Are all cyclones named after females? ›

Until 1975, tropical storms all around the world were only given feminine names. This changed when former Australian Minister of Science Bill Morrison decided to start naming storms after both male and female names, in recognition of it being International Women's Year.

Why are tropical cyclones named differently? ›

The names are intended to reduce confusion in the event of concurrent storms in the same basin. Once storms develop sustained wind speeds of more than 33 knots (61 km/h; 38 mph), names are generally assigned to them from predetermined lists, depending on the basin in which they originate.

How storm names are chosen? ›

How are the names picked? Since September 2015, the Met Office has asked people for suggestions for storm names. The most popular names put forward by the public are made into a list, along with other names suggested by Met Eireann (Ireland's equivalent of the Met Office).

How cyclones are named who names them? ›

Who names cyclones? The tropical cyclones forming over different Ocean basins are named by the concerned RSMCs & TCWCs. For north Indian Ocean including Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea, the RSMC, New Delhi assigns the name to tropical cyclones following a standard procedure.

How is a cyclone named or classified? ›

Any storm with maximum sustained winds greater than or equal to 40 mph is given a name from a list generated by the World Meteorological Organization (a branch of the United Nations). Six such lists exist for each basin, and a different is used each year. That means that every six years, a list is re-used.

Why are storms given female names? ›

Although there was plenty of precedent for naming storms after both women and men, the U.S. decided in the early 1950s to settle on a system that only used female names. It's not entirely clear why, but the maritime tradition of referring to the ocean as a woman may have played a factor.

How are tropical cyclones classified? ›

They are classified as follows: Tropical Depression: A tropical cyclone with maximum sustained winds of 38 mph (33 knots) or less. Tropical Storm: A tropical cyclone with maximum sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph (34 to 63 knots). Hurricane: A tropical cyclone with maximum sustained winds of 74 mph (64 knots) or higher.

Learn about names used for tropical cyclones worldwide

Some continuously cycle through names without reverting to "A" each year and some start a new list each year.. W : Western North Pacific (west of 180 °). C : Central North Pacific (140-180 °W). E : Eastern North Pacific (east of 140 °W). L : North Atlantic. A : Arabian sea. B : Bay of Bengal. S : South Indian Ocean (west of 135 °E). P : South Pacific Ocean (east of 135 °E). Q : South Atlantic. List 1List 2List 3List 4List 5 DamreyKong-reyNakriKrovanh (2020)TrasesHaikuiYutuFengshenDujuanMulanKirogiTorajiKalmaegiSurigaeMeariKai-takMan-yiFung-wongChoi-wanMa-onTembin (2017)Usagi (2018)KammuriKogumaTokageBolavenPabukPhanfone (2019)ChampiHinnamnorSanbaWutipVongfongIn-faMuifaJelawatSepatNuriCempakaMerbokEwiniarMunSinlakuNepartakNanmadolMaliksi DanasHagupitLupitTalasGaemiNariJangmiMirinaeNoruPrapiroonWiphaMekkhalaNidaKulapMariaFranciscoHigosOmaisRokeSon-TinhLekimaBaviConsonSoncaAmpilKrosaMaysakChanthuNesatWukongBailuHaishenDianmuHaitangJongdariPodulNoulMindulleNalgaeShanshanLinglingDolphinLionrockBanyanYagiKajikiKujiraKompasuYamanekoLeepiFaxaiChan-homNamtheunPakharBebincaPeipahLinfaMalouSanvuRumbiaTapahNangkaNyatohMawarSoulikMitagSaudelRai (2021)GucholCimaronHagibisMolaveMalakasTalimJebiNeoguriGoniMegiDoksuriMangkhutBualoiAtsaniChabaKhanunBarijatMatmoEtauAereLanTramiHalongVamcoSongdaSaolaSince 2000 onwards, a new international list of names has been used for tropical storms in the North-West Pacific basin and are assigned by the Japan Meteorological Agency as storms develop.. 20172018201920212022 Auring (01W) Agaton (Bolaven) Auring (Dujuan) Agaton (Megi) Bising (-) Basyang (Sanba) Bising (Surigae) Basyang (Malakas) Crising (02W) Caloy (Jelawat) Crising (03W) Caloy (Chaba) Dante (Muifa) Domeng (Maliksi) Dante (Choi-wan) Domeng (Aere) Emong (Nanmadol) Ester (Gaemi) Emong (07W) Ester (Trases) Fabian (Roke) Florita (Prapiroon) Fabian (In-fa) Florita (Ma-on) Gorio (Nesat) Gardo (Maria) Gorio (Mirinae) Gardo (13W) Huaning (Haitang) Henry (Son-tinh) Huaning (-) Henry (Hinnamnor) Isang (Hato) Inday (Ampil) Isang (Omais) IndayJolina (Pakhar) Josie (13W) Jolina (Conson) JosieKiko (Guchol) Karding (Yagi) Kiko (Chanthu) KardingLannie (Talim) Luis (24W) Lannie (Lionrock) LuisMaring (Doksuri) Maymay (Jebi) Maring (Kompasu) MaymayNando (22W) Neneng (Barijat) Nando (-) NenengOdette (Khanun) Ompong (Mangkhut) Odette (Rai) ObetPaolo (Lan) Paeng (Trami) PaoloPaengQuedan (Saola) Queenie (Kong-rey) QuedanQueenieRamil (Damrey) Rosita (Yutu) RamilRosalSalome (Haikui) SamuelSalomeSamuelTino (Kirogi) TomasTinoTomasUrduja (Kai-tak) UsmanUwanUmbertoVinta (Tembin) VenusVerbenaVenusWilmaWaldoWilmaWaldoYasminYayangYasminYayangZoraidaZenyZoraidaZenyThese lists of names are applied by PAGASA to any storms in the Philippine area (5-25 °N and 115-135 °E) and are used in addition to the name given to the storm from the JMA list for the North-west Pacific, which are shown in parentheses.. The years that the names were used are given in parentheses.. If all names from a list are exhausted, names from the reserve list will be used.. From 2021 if all names from a list are exhausted, names from the reserve list will be used rather than letters of the Greek alphabet.. Names used from 2004 onwardsList 1List 2List 3List 4List 5List 6List 7List 8 OnilOgni (2006)Nisha (2008)GiriHelenChapalaOckhi (2017)FaniAgni (2004)AkashBijliJal (2010)LeharMegh (2015)SagarVayuHibaruGonuAilaKeilaMadi (2013)RoanuMekunuHikaaPyarrYemyinPhyanThane (2011)NanaukKyantDayeKyarrBaazSidr (2007)Ward (2009)MurjanHudhudNadaLubanMahaFanoos (2005)NargisLailaNilam (2012)Nilofar (2014)Vardah (2016)TitliBulbulMalaRashmiBanduMahasenAshobaaMaaruthaGajaPawan (2019)MukdaKhai-MukPhetPhailinKomenMoraPhethai (2018)Amphan New List 1New List 2New List 3New List 4New List 5New List 6New List 7New List 8 NisargaBiparjoyArnabUpakulBarshonRajaniNishithUrmiGatiTejMurasuAagVyomJharProbahoNeerNivarHamoonAkvanSepandBooranAnahitaAzarPooyanBurevi (2020)MidhiliKaaniOdiKenauEndheriRiyauGuruvaTauktaeMichaungNgamannKyarthitSapakyeeWetwunMwaihoutKyweYaasRemalSailNaseemMuznSadeemDimaManjourGulabAsnaSahabAfshanManahilShujanaParwazZannataShaheenDanaLuluMoujSuhailSadafReemRayhanJawad (2021)FengalGhazeerAsifSidrahHareedFaidKaseerAsaniShakhtiGigumGaganaVerambhaGarjanaNeebaNinnadaSitrangMonthaThianyotBulanPhutalaAiyaraSamingKraisonMandousSenyarAfoorNahhaamQuffalDaamanDeemGargoorMochaDitwahDiksamSiraBakhurGhwyziHawfBalhafThese lists will be used sequentially.. The years that the names were used are given in parentheses.. List E is a list of replacement names if they become necessary.. The years that the names were used are given in parentheses.. The years that the names were used are given in parentheses.

For several hundred years, many hurricanes in the West Indies were named after the particular saint's day on which the hurricane occurred. Ivan R. Tannehill describes in his book "Hurricanes" the major tropical storms of recorded history and mentions many hurricanes named after saints.

For several hundred years, many hurricanes in the West Indies were named after the particular saint's day on which the hurricane occurred.. Ivan R. Tannehill describes in his book "Hurricanes" the major tropical storms of recorded history and mentions many hurricanes named after saints.. The practice of naming hurricanes solely after women came to an end in 1978 when men's and women's names were included in the Eastern North Pacific storm lists.. National Hurricane Center Atlantic Ocean area of responsibility.The National Hurricane Center (RSMC Miami, FL) is responsible for the Atlantic basin west of 30°W.. If a disturbance intensifies into a tropical storm the Center will give the storm a name from one of the six lists (right)(below).. On average there are 11 names tropical cyclones, with six becoming hurricanes, and of those eight, on average two become Category 3 or greater.. National Hurricane Center Northeast Pacific Ocean area of responsibility.The National Hurricane Center (RSMC Miami, FL) is is also responsible for the North East Pacific basin east of 140°W.. If a disturbance intensifies into a tropical storm the Center will give the storm a name from one of the six lists below.. On average there are 15 names tropical cyclones, with eight becoming hurricanes, and of those eight, on average three become Category 3 or greater.. List 1 Akoni. Ema. Hone. Iona. Keli. Lala. Moke. Nolo. Olana. Pena. Ulana. Wale List 2 Aka. Ekeka. Hene. Iolana. Keoni. Lino. Mele. Nona. Oliwa. Pama. Upana. Wene List 3 Alika. Ele. Huko. Iopa. Kika. Lana. Maka. Neki. Omeka. Pewa. Unala. Wali List 4 Ana. Ela. Halola. Iune. Kilo. Loke. Malia. Niala. Oho. Pali. Ulika. Walaka. Central Pacific Hurricane Center area of responsibility Central Pacific Hurricane Center (RSMC Honolulu, HI) area of responsibility is from 140°W longitude to 180° longitude.. List 1 Akoni. Ema. Hone. Iona. Keli. Lala. Moke. Nolo. Olana. Pena. Ulana. Wale List 2 Aka. Ekeka. Hene. Iolana. Keoni. Lino. Mele. Nona. Oliwa. Pama. Upana. Wene List 3 Alika. Ele. Huko. Iopa. Kika. Lana. Maka. Neki. Omeka. Pewa. Unala. Wali List 4 Ana. Ela. Halola. Iune. Kilo. Loke. Malia. Niala. Oho. Pali. Ulika. Walaka. Lists of names for other tropical cyclone basins outside of National Hurricane Center's area of responsibility can be found on the World Meteorological Organization tropical cyclone naming page .. 2005 Atlantic Hurricane Season 2005 was the most active Atlantic hurricane season in recorded history.

This is a sample lesson page from the Certificate of Achievement in Weather Forecasting offered by the Penn State Department of Meteorology. Any questions about this program can be directed to: Steve Seman

Before we get into how tropical cyclones are named, let's look at the areas where tropical cyclones tend to form.. The World Meteorology Organization created a branch called the Tropical Cyclone Programme (TCP) to ensure that all countries bordering and within each basin are adequately prepared for the threat posed by tropical cyclones.. For example, the official advisories and forecasts for the Atlantic Basin come from: the National Hurricane Center in Miami, but the Canadian Hurricane Centre in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia issues warnings when tropical cyclones threaten Canada, using the National Hurricane Center's products as their basis.. When a depression is classified in the Atlantic, the National Hurricane Center simply refers to it by its number ("One", "Two", etc.). Letters used to Identify the Basin of Origin of Invests and Tropical DepressionsLetterBasinLNorth AtlanticWWestern North Pacific (west of 180°)CCentral North Pacific (140 to 180°W)EEastern North Pacific (east of 140°W)AArabian SeaBBay of BengalSSouth Indian Ocean (west of 135°E)PSouth Pacific Ocean (east of 135°E)Once a tropical cyclone reaches sustained wind speeds of at least 34 knots (39 miles per hour), it becomes a tropical storm and receives a name (more on the naming of tropical cyclones in a bit).. Once a tropical cyclone reaches maximum sustained winds of at least 64 knots (74 miles per hour), it loses its "tropical storm" label, and earns the classification of hurricane, typhoon, severe cyclonic storm, tropical cyclone or severe tropical cyclone, depending on the basin in which the storm is located (see the table below for what words are used in each basin.. In the Northwest Pacific Basin, for example, the particularly descriptive classification of " super typhoon " is used once a typhoon's maximum sustained wind speed reaches at least 130 knots (more than twice the minimum typhoon wind speed).. In the Atlantic and eastern Pacific, the World Meteorological Organization and National Weather Service (NWS) have used lists of alternating male and female names in alphabetical order to christen storms since 1979 (check out the lists currently in use , if you wish).. Because not many tropical cyclones form in the Central Pacific, they don't restart the list from the beginning each year, and instead they just keep using the same list until all the names have been used.. You can see the lists of names for tropical cyclones in the North Indian Ocean and all other tropical basins (including basins not covered in-depth here) on the World Meteorological Organization's page of tropical cyclone names .. Some Memorable Super Typhoons The northwest Pacific basin is home to some of the most impressive tropical cyclones in the entire world, and the term used to classify extremely strong tropical cyclones in the basin -- "super typhoon" is very appropriate.. In modern times, there have never been two simultaneous super typhoons with such great, sustained intensity.. Prior to the current convention in the northwest Pacific, JTWC forecasters started to use female names for tropical cyclones in 1945.

Calendar seasons

Prior to 2021, Atlantic ocean or Eastern Pacific ocean tropical cyclone seasons that used up the full list of 21 randomly assigned tropical cyclone names were given auxiliary names by letters from the Greek alphabet.. The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season was the first of two seasons to exhaust the main list.The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season was the second of two seasons to exhaust the main list.. There were only two tropical cyclone years on record that exhausted their main list, the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season and the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season.. Hurricane Delta explosively deepened from a depression to a Category 4 hurricane in 30 hours, making it the fastest strengthening tropical cyclone in the Atlantic to go from tropical depression to Category 4 on record.. Hurricane Iota was yet another explosive storm, and was the latest Category 5 hurricane in the Atlantic ocean, but in post-analysis it was downgraded to a category 4 storm.. Tropical Storm Alpha (2005) - a tropical storm that struck Haiti in October 2005 Subtropical Storm Alpha (2020) - hit Portugal, the first to do so. 2005 Atlantic hurricane season 2020 Atlantic hurricane season Tropical cyclone naming Greek alphabet

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